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2017-2018 Association of Firearm Instructors – Glossary of Firearm Terms

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Our 2017-2018 Glossary of Firearm Terms was first compiled three years ago and is updated regularly.

Designed to act as an introductory course to firearm terms, lingo, and jargon, this resource is a must-have for anyone who wants to expand or enhance their working knowledge of firearms.

 

FREE! Because you are (or were referred by) an NRA Member,

through the end of May,

this resource is absolutely free!


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Product Description

Our 2017- Glossary of Firearm Terms is a handy, must-have supplemental resource for any introductory firearm training course. It defines 600 of the most common and critical terms, lingo, jargon and acronyms in the industry. Written with the novice in mind, it offers complete educational details and images for shooters who want to expand or enhance their working knowledge of firearms.

Instructors are encouraged to share it with new shooters who want to learn more about the firearm industry. Because many instructors take for granted the confusion new shooters face when beginning their training, this is a great tool to clarify meanings.

It is written to take the mystique out of many terms that are unique to the industry and includes pictures where necessary to ensure readers understand meanings appropriately. It contains information that makes it an ideal refresher for seasoned gun enthusiasts.

Though this resource is not free, it is provided to anyone who needs it and cannot afford the purchase price. All they have to do is send an email to the company requesting a copy.

Politicians and journalists are encouraged to use this glossary when they write about issues relating to firearms when they are not certain that they are using the proper vernacular. For instance, the term “assault weapon” is often used loosely to refer to rifles that do not meet that definition.

 

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